DNA Phasing of Raw DNA When One Sibling is Missing: Part 10

In this Blog, I would like to portray my phasing results in an Excel Bar Chart if possible. This has been one of the most difficult parts a phasing my DNA for me.

I have looked at Stacked Bar Charts in Excel as they seem to be the closest to what I am looking for. Today I looked at a method for producing Gantt Charts at ablebits.com which seems to hold some promise of application for DNA mapping:

bar-chart-excel

I had my Maternal Patterns’ Starts and Stops from my last blog. I took those and converted them to Build 36 and put them in a spreadsheet:

momcrossoverstable

Start is the ID# I was using. Start36 is the Chromosome position of the Start of the pattern in Build 36. App ID is the approximate position of the Crossover. Then I have that same location in Build 37 and Build 36. Following the logic in the Ablebits.com tutorial, I have the first Maternal Crossovers for Chromosome 7 in my simplified Chart:

matfirstxover7

I got this by choosing the Build 36 column and choosing Insert Stacked Bar. I suppose a better Title would have been Chromosome 7 Maternal Crossover rather than Build 36. This was taken from my Column Header. The goal is to get a 2 color bar above. However, I already see a problem. The bar needs to be different colors for different people. Well, I have to start somewhere.

Next, I put in the next crossover location for each person. I took this position and subtracted from it the first Crossover to get a length.

step2crossexcel

You may note that the Bar Chart inverts the original order. It gives Sharon a 4 which is now on top. Here is my visual phasing of Chromosome 7 that I am trying to replicate:

chr7visphase

My Excel Bar Chart order is Sharon, Jon, Joel, Heidi. My visual phasing order is Sharon, Joel, Heidi, Jon. The 2 maternal colors I have above are green and orange representing Lentz and Rathfelder. If I keep orange as Rathfelder, that means I want to change bar 2 and 3 (Joel and Jon) on the Excel Bar Chart. One way to do this is to move over the first Crossovers for Joel and Jon in my spreadsheet:

modchart

However, that made the 2 male siblings’ first maternal grandparent match too long. I needed to move the start over 2 places in my spreadsheet:

mat7revised

Now the Chr7 Maternal Crossover column can be called Lentz and the 2length column can be called Rathfelder.

Next, I added another column for the next Lentz portion of DNA:

chr73rdxover

I was hoping that if I named the next column Lentz, that Excel would give me the same blue as the first Lentz. I was able to right click on the gray and change it to blue. I then added another Rathfelder segment. For this to work in Excel, a Rathfelder length is added rather than a start and stop location.

chr7xover3

Again, I had to reformat the Excel-chosen color to be consistent with what I had for Rathfelder. I chose the last position for Heidi and Sharon as the highest that I had as this was their last segment. After a bit of wrangling with Excel, I was able to get this:

chr7

So that is the presentation. However, I notice that on my visual phasing, I had 5 segments for Jon and only 4 here. I missed his last Rathfelder segment. I had ended Jon’s Chromosome too early. Here is the correction:

chr7corrected

It still looks like one of Jon’s crossovers in the middle of the Chromosome may be off, but I’ll have to figure that out later.

Paternal Bar Chart

Now that I have something that looks like a maternal Chromosome Map, I need the paternal side to go along with it. It looks like if I add 4 more rows to my spreadsheet, I may have it.

I did this and I added Hartley and Frazer (my paternal side grandparents) to the right of the maternal side grandparents. I had to make a new chart that came out like this:

chr7matpat

Here #4 is my Paternal DNA. I found it a bit disconcerting that my paternal side was longer than the maternal. Here I’ve added a bit of formatting and made the colors consistent (one color per grandparent):

chr7patmatmap

Well, I guess I’ll just leave this imperfect. It will give me something to work on later. I did change the scale from millions to M’s to be easier to read.  The above shows that Jon and Heidi share their paternal grandfather’s Hartley DNA un-recombined on Chromosome 7.

Summary and Conclusions

  • Learning how to phase my raw DNA has been interesting and time consuming
  • Delving into the A’s, G’s, T’s and C’s promotes understanding of one’s DNA
  • I owe a lot to M MacNeill and Whit Athey in learning how to do this phasing
  • Due to the data intensive nature of phasing, I would recommend the use of MS Access or some other database software.
  • An understanding of Excel or similar spreadsheet software is also important.
  • I had tested my brother Jon as an afterthought. It turned out that his test results were important in determining the phasing of the 4 siblings.
  • I have the overall skeleton of the phasing with crossovers. There is still a lot of work to complete the individual Chromosomes and trouble shoot problem areas.
  • Further, I have not worked on the X Chromosome due to the different nature of that Chromosome. My brother and I are already phased. My sisters are not.
  • Once these maps are done they will be a reference to all matches to my 3 siblings and myself.

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