Chasing Down My Wife’s Rooney Connections

My wife’s father is half Irish and half French Canadian. On the French Canadian side there seems to be  a lot of genealogy and a lot of DNA matches. On the Irish side, there is a not so much genealogy and a lot less identified DNA matches.

Mapping the French Canadian and Irish In Laws

I have used a method to map out my father in law’s DNA that he got from his four grandparents. To do this, I compared him to his two sisters, Lorraine and Virginia. Here is their Chromosome 14.

The good news was that I could map the Chromosomes by looking at the DNA results of the three siblings compared to each other. Then I could find many matches to reference the French Canadian side. That got me the LeFevre and Pouliot grandparents above. The problem was that I couldn’t find enough matches to reference the Irish side.

Gaby to the rescue

However, on AncestryDNA I found my wife’s 2nd cousin on the Irish side. Because of Gaby, I can now tell which of my father in law’s grandparents are Irish.

Any DNA matches that Gaby has in common with Lorraine, Richard or Virginia are Irish. Gaby and my wife Marie, share the same Butler and Kerivan Irish ancestors. The next problem is that we can’t tell whether these matches are Kerivan or Butler.

Working Gedmatch To Get Kerivan and/or Butler Matches

In order to separate the Butlers from the Kerivans, we need to find matches that are further out. To find these I looked at DNA matches at Gedmatch that matched both Gaby and Lorraine. I used Lorraine because she was tested at AncestryDNA. The matches would be on the Irish side. That was the first cut. Next, I hoped that some of these matches would have trees at Ancestry that would match my in-law’s tree.

For example, here is someone that matched both Lorraine and Gaby on our example Chromosome 14.

The above image shows how Lorraine matches someone with a Rooney name (#1) and Gaby (#2). This tells me that this Rooney match is on the paternal side or Irish side, so that is also good. The other good thing is that my father in law’s grandmother’s mother was a Rooney:

All I have to show is that the match indicated in yellow above with the Rooney name is related to Alice Mary Rooney above. There were other common surnames, so the match didn’t have to be a Rooney. However, I noticed that there were some Rooneys in Massachusetts which is where my wife’s Rooney ancestors lived. Based on that, I thought that it would be a good idea to start with Rooney.

Doing the Rooney Genealogy

Lorraine’s Rooney AncestryDNA match that is also at Gedmatch and matches with Gaby at Chromosome has a Rooney Tree:

However, these two trees seem a little out of whack. Maybe Timothy Rooney in my wife’s tree could be a brother of Terrance Rooney in the Rooney tree?

A third Rooney Tree

I found another Rooney tree as an Ancestry Hint. It looks like this in a different view:

This tree shows that Timothy Rooney had two wives. It appears that Margaret Gorman was the first wife and had a John Rooney born 1827. Apparently Ann Nancy Lilley was the second wife and had Alice Mary Rooney. That could explain why the two trees didn’t match up. This tree shows the Terrence Rooney from the Rooney Tree as the same Timothy Rooney from my tree.

Putting the rooney trees together

Assuming that the Rooney Tree reconciliation was correct, the Rooney DNA match on the bottom right in purple would be a 1/2 third cousin once removed to my father in law Richard and his two sisters.

Back to the Chromosome 14 Map

That looks better. We now have the paternal side thanks to Gaby and a Rooney match. When I check the Rooney match, he matches Lorraine and Richard, but not Virginia.

The yellow matches on the Gedmatch Chromosome browser correspond with the green in the Chromosome 14 map above. The crossover for Richard at 54M also shows up.

The other good thing about the new Chromosome map is that it shows where the Butler matches would be. This is like a spy glass looking into the past. A match on the Butler side is like a match with Virginia’s grandfather who was born in 1875. Matches to these grandparents should be helpful in straightening out my wife’s Irish genealogy.

Summary

  • Use a paternal cousin to find other paternal cousin matches that are more distant
  • Connect that further out cousin to a known ancestor
  • Use that further out cousin match to complete a Chromosome map
  • Use that completed Chromosome map to identify other cousins as they match in identified areas of the Chromosome map representing grandparents of my father in law.
  • Use those identified matches to focus on further genealogy and break down former research barriers.
  • This method works best with people that have DNA testing results at both Gedmatch and Ancestry.

Visual Phasing Butler DNA on Chromosome 2

The Butlers are my wife’s family. Over a year ago, I wrote a Blog called “Uncle Naffy, DNA and the Butler Brick Wall“. In that Blog, I wrote about how a match with Uncle Naffy who is believed to be a Crowley relative helped in producing a breakthrough in the Butler genealogy. Uncle Naffy is a rare paternal Butler match. Most of the Butler matches have been maternal on the French Canadian side.

Visual Mapping of Chromosomes

Since writing the Uncle Naffy Blog, I have also become aware of a tool to map Chromosomes. This visual mapping procedure was developed by Kathy Johnston. As the Uncle Naffy match was on Chromosome 2, why not map that Chromosome? In order to map my father in law Richard’s four grandparents, I need his results and two siblings. Since my Uncle Naffy Blog, I have tested Richards two sisters: Lorraine and Virginia. When I compare these three siblings at their Chromosomes 2, this is what I get:

  • In the green regions, the paired-up siblings share the DNA from two of their same grandparents.
  • In the yellow regions, the sibling pairs share one grandparent
  • In the red regions, the sibling pairs share no grandparents in common. That means they have their DNA from the opposite grandparent pair.
  • The areas between the green, yellow and red regions with the vertical lines added are the crossovers.
  • The crossovers are assigned to the person who has the most shared crossover regions
  • The numbers added are the approximate positions in millions of the crossovers
assigning the crossovers

Lorraine gets the first crossover because she is the one in common in the first two comparisons where the match goes from green to yellow. The other crossovers are from the same reasoning. Richard is in the top and bottom comparisons.

Mapping three butlers

I start by using two colors where Richard and Virginia match representing their shared Fully Identical Region (FIR) shared in green. These two colors represent the same grandparents that Richard and Virginia inherited their DNA from – one on their maternal side and one on their paternal side.

Richard is stuck between his two crossover points (R) but Virginia can go out in either direction to her two crossover points (V):

By using other green areas or Fully Identical Regions (FIRs) and areas where pairs don’t match using opposite colors, I get this:

This leaves a few holes. At this point we need to select a Half Identical Region (HIR). It would be nice to get Lorraine to the right side as she doesn’t have any more crossovers there. Lorraine and Virginia share a HIR from 128 to 204, so we will pick one color from each on Lorraine’s row and extend those to the right. As I mentioned, she has no crossovers we know about there to stop her.

I can fill in a little more using the FIRs and no-match areas.

Now we have four relative grandparents without names in a lot of these three siblings chromosomes. Using known matches, we can fill some of these in. The paternal grandparents are Butler and Kerivan. The maternal grandparents are LeFevre and Pouliot.

Adding relatives

The best known relative for this purpose is a 2nd cousin. Richard and his sisters have two known second cousins on the Pouliot side:

Here, the Pouliot matches didn’t help, due to a blank space. The Uncle Naffy match, assumed to be a Butler match helped. There was only one place that it could go. That sets the paternal side and also will make the green be Kerivan.

What now?

At this point I have two options. One, I can look for more matches or I can try to re-do the mapping. I tried looking around Ancestry for more matches. There are plenty of Pouliot matches there, but it is difficult to trace them to Gedmatch, or perhaps the Pouliot matches are not uploaded to Gedmatch. Right now, we have a proposed match identifying the paternal side. It would be nice to somehow get both sides.

Second Try at mapping Chromosome 2

In our two reference matches, we have Richard. He matches Pouliot and he matches Uncle Naffy. Also Lorraine matches both those reference matches. So let’s work on our Lorraine/Richard matches, rather than concentrating on Virginia who didn’t have too many crossovers. Between 128 and 149 Lorraine and Richard don’t match. This will be represented by two opposite colors.

Next, expand the segments to the crossovers:

That is good because our segments are now over our reference matches (Richard is over the Pouliot match and Lorraine’s represented DNA is over her Butler match). Next we can use the relationships with Lorraine on the right to create new segments from their relative grandparents (no pun intended).

Now we have another problem, we need both Lorraine and Richard to be expanded to the blue and yellow matches. Perhaps if we extend Lorraine to the left with an HIR, then Virginia will be opposite of Lorraine and Richard oppose of Virginia, it will work out to fill in the segments over our reference relative matches.

There. Now all we have to do is match the Pouliot (blue) and the Butler (yellow). The only colors the same between Lorraine and Richard above the blue is green, so that has to be Pouliot which is maternal. That means that the maternal side Butler is now top bar. The only color on the top bar (or either bar, for that matter) that is the same over the yellow Butler match is purple.

But there is more that I can do. Notice on Virginia’s Chromosome. I haven’t moved her over to her left-most crossover. This should help fill in some more.

Note that two crossovers in a row in a HIR cause a problem such as the L-L on the left side and the V-V on the right. However, I’m happy with the results. I now have the first Chromosome with 4 Butler grandparents. This is based on the presumption that Uncle Naffy is a Crowley relative who is ancestral to the Butler side. Virginia will be a good person to look for Kerivan matches. Lorraine looks like the best shot for checking Butler matches on Chromosome 2.

Finding Crossovers by comparing first cousins

It appears that we can look at these three sibling’s maternal cousins (Pat and Joe) to determine more crossovers. Here are Lorraine’s matches:

The crossover between Lorraine and Patricia is not clear by looking at the first yellow bar. But look above. This bar has a break between 67.4 and 67.9M that is not visible. That tells me that the maternal crossover for Lorraine occurs at that location.

Other crossovers

For Lorraines’ first crossover position, I will need to look at the Gedmatch expanded view. When I compare Lorraine to Virginia, I choose the full resolution box and get this:

Each up arrow (^) is 1M, so Lorraine’s crossover is at 27M. A little further on the same comparison is the change from HIR to FIR:

I would estimate this crossover at about 36.7M. These are the numbers for Lorraine and Virginia’s first crossovers:

Note that Richard’s first crossover is very close to his sister Virginia’s. Here is a closeup view of Richard’s first crossover using his comparison to Virginia:

There is a ^ mark right in the middle of the HIR for Richard and Virginia. Counting back from 40, that mark is 37. The FIR starts up again about 37.5, so that will be Richard’s first crossover.

Richard’s relatives on the chromosome browser

Here is a comparison of Richard to a nephew, two maternal first cousins and two second cousins on the Pouliot side, John as a nephew, may match on the maternal or paternal side. He is the son of another sibling of this trio not tested. Here, he appears to match on Richard’s paternal side

I’ll add in that maternal crossover for Richard:

Then the HIRs are added in for Lorraine and Virginia:

Once Richard’s crossover was found to be on the maternal side, that required his sisters’ first crossovers to be on the maternal side also.

filling in virginia’s blank spot

We just have a little area to fill in past 200M for Virginia. Is her crossover paternal or maternal? Here is how Virginia matches her nephew, and two maternal first cousins. The numbers that we will be looking for will be 224 and 227.

What we see is 224M. That means to me that there is no maternal crossover at 227 as all the matches carry on to what looks to be the end of the Chromosome. Therefore the 227 crossover must be on the paternal (Butler/Kerivan) side. Here is the completed Chromosome 2 map.

One observation is that the trio of siblings comes up short on Butler DNA (purple) for about the first third of the Chromosome.

Here are my wife’s father’s four grandparents all born in the 1870’s:

Bonus Feature: My Wife’s DNA a la Blaine Bettinger

Blaine Bettinger recently wrote a great instructive 5 Part Blog on Visual Phasing. My Blogs are my muddling and meddling with DNA. Blaine’s Blogs on the other hand are instructive. Part Four of Blaine’s Series shows how to take the results of the parent (and Aunts in this case) and apply them to the child (in this case my wife). I’ll look at Blaine’s Part Four and apply it to my wife. Here is Marie’s Dad’s Chromosome 2:

This tells me where Marie may or may not be getting DNA. She will get half of her DNA from her dad, but that will be a full Chromosome. To the extent that she gets her dad’s paternal side what she gets will be only Kerivan in the first two thirds and Butler in the last third.

Marie compared to Aunts Lorraine and virginia

Here I copied Blaine’s format, but was tempted to add some vertical lines. The browser images compare Marie to Aunt Lorraine and her Aunt Virginia.

Marie has one empty bar which we hope to fill with her 4 paternal great grandparents. Comparing Marie to Lorraine, they share a segment and then they don’t. With Marie compared to Virginia, the two keep sharing the same segment apparently. This appears to be Pouliot as Lorraine has a crossover from Pouliot to LeFevre right where she stops matching Marie. One way to check this is by comparing Marie to her dad’s maternal cousin. Marie matches that cousin in this segment which agrees with my reasoning as Pouliot is a maternal match.

For the next segment, it appears I can use the same reasoning. Marie matches Lorraine and Virginia but this time Lorraine’s match drops off right where she has a crossover from Kerivan to Butler. That makes me think that the match there is with Kerivan. Another way to look at it is that it has to be Kerivan there as Lorraine and Virginia don’t share a common grandparent on their maternal side in that location. Marie has to have the maternal Kerivan DNA in that location.

The next segment has to be Kerivan or Pouliot. Marie matches Virginia there who has Kerivan DNA, so that has to be it. That extends Marie’s Kerivan DNA. Next is the largest segment. Marie matches neither of her Aunts in that segment. The only grandparent that her Aunts don’t match in that segment is Pouliot. So far, Marie has no Butler nor LeFevre DNA:

In the next to the last segment, Marie does not match Virginia. That leaves her with Butler or Pouliot DNA. However, that is not helpful as Marie gets Butler or LeFevre from her father. Marie matches Lorraine, but that also could be Butler or LeFevre. It’s a split decision. In the last segment, there is a clue. Virginia matches Marie for Virginia’s entire maternal LeFevre segment. So that has to be LeFevre. If it was a Butler match, it wouldn’t be the entire segment as Virginia has some Kerivan in there that Marie could not have inherited from her father in that location.

Let’s try to reason through the empty space again.

  • Lorraine – matches on either Butler or LeFevre
  • Virginia – doesn’t match on Kerivan nor Pouliot which leaves, again, Butler or LeFevre
  • Richard – has on Butler or LeFevre

I suppose that this segment would more likely be LeFevre than Butler as larger segments are the rule more than smaller ones between father and daughter, however, I have no certaintly with that, so I will leave the segment blank for now.

The maternal cousins to the rescue

It’s time to bring back Pat and Joe. They are Marie’s father’s maternal first cousins. Here is where Marie matches them:

Due to the fact that Marie matches both of her father’s cousins at 222M before Virginia’s crossover at 225M means that Marie has a maternal match in that area. Here is Marie’s Paternal Chromosome 2 filled in:

Marie appears to be Butlerless or Butler free in Chromosome 2. This is a good example showing that Marie got exactly half of her DNA from her father and half from her mother. However, when we consider her Paternal Chromosome 2, she does not get 1/4 from each of her paternal great grandparents. She got 0% from her Butler great grandparent. She also got roughly 1/3 from her paternal grandfather and 2/3 from her paternal grandmother.

Back to Uncle Naffy

This brings the story full circle. I started this Blog based on a few large matches with Uncle Naffy. Uncle Naffy’s family stories lead me to believe that he was related to the Crowleys. A Crowley married the first Irish immigrant Butler in my wife’s line. I identified the Paternal Grandparents in the visual phasing in this Blog based on the assumption that Uncle Naffy was indeed a Crowley descendant. So, ironically, Uncle Naffy’s match results lead to the mapping of my father in law and his sisters’ Butler DNA which lead to the conclusion that my Butler wife Marie had no Butler DNA in her Chromosome 2.

Summary and Observations

  • The maternal side of these Butlers chromosomes are easier to map than the paternal side due to lack of verified paternal matches
  • The paternal side match with Uncle Naffy has not been linked to a tree, so will have to be verified at some point.
  • Having cousin matches made it possible to fill in this map. Otherwise it would still have blanks.
  • While writing this, I may have found a Kerivan ancestor match. I will follow up on that and likely write another blog on what I find.
  • Once some good Kerivan and/or Butler matches are found, they will likely lead to other verified matches on those lines. It is difficult to break through and get those first identifying paternal matches.
  • I had thought that my wife’s DNA results were somewhat obsolete after getting her parents’ results. Now I see that I can map her great grandparents thanks to Blaine Bettinger’s instructive Blog.

Solving Joanna’s Mystery DNA Match with Visual Mapping

Recently I had a question from Joanna, who is part of a Frazer DNA Project that I’m working on. She has a large mystery match and would like to know which side of the family the match is on. Joanna is also interested in having her chromosomes mapped using Visual Phasing. Visual Phasing is a method that Kathy Johnston has pioneered using the DNA results of at least 3 siblings. Blaine Bettinger has also written a 5 part series on this subject.  Perhaps the mapping could help her find out what side of her family this mystery match is on.

Joanna’s Mystery DNA Connection with Mystery Vickey

Joanna’s siblings are Janet and Jonathan. I will check Gedmatch.com to see how the three siblings match up with Vickey.

vickeytojoanna

On Vickey’s One to Many list, I saw Joanna and Janet, but not Jonathan. You can see why Joanna is interested as her match with Vickey is 55 cM. I didn’t want to leave out Jonathan, so I ran a One to One between him and Vickey at Gedmatch;

vickeyjonathan

Jonathan does match Vickey, but he just fell off the bottom of Vickey’s One to Many List. The start of Jonathan’s match is at the start of Joanna’s orange bar above. His match with Vickey ends before his sister Janet’s match with Vickey starts. Now, in Joanna’s family we have a small, medium and large match with Mystery Vickey.

Visual Mapping of Joanna, Janet and Jonathan

As all the above matches are on Chromosome 13, it would make sense to start there. The first step is to compare the 3 siblings in the Gedmatch Chromosome Browser:

chromosomebrowserjjj

I then added crossover lines and attempted to assign the right sibling or siblings to the right crossover. This Chromosome was not simple. It looks like there are or could be close crossovers in three different places – around position 29, 33 and 98. In addition, something strange seems to be going on at the 72/73/74 location. That leaves only 2 crossovers which appear to be less than complicated. Those are: the first crossover which I have given to Jonathan and; the crossover at 62 which I gave to Janet.

Mapping the JJJ siblings

From 33 to about 73, Joanna and Jonathan have a Fully Identical Region (FIR). That means in that area, Joanna and Jonathan got their DNA from two of the same grandparents. One of those grandparents was on their Paternal side and one on the Maternal side.

chr13jjjfir

Above I’ve portrayed Joanna and Jonathan’s shared grandparents as blue and red. The next step is extending the blue and red bars. I’ll keep Jonathan’s two grandparents where they are as he has crossovers on either side. However, I’ll extend Joanna’s DNA from her 2 grandparents to the right. Should I extend them to 98 or to the end?

A single or double crossover at 98?

The simplest scenario at Position 98 would be a crossover assigned to Joanna. Joanna is the common factor in the first two comparisons, so that would make sense. In that scenario, neither Janet nor Jonathan would have crossovers at 98. However, that does not appear to go along with what we know. Recall above that I looked at Vickey’s match with Joanna and Janet:

vickeytojoanna

Why isn’t Janet matching Vickey for 55 cM as Joanna is? Something happened around Position 97. That something has to be a crossover for Janet. That sets a few things in motion. Now that we know Janet has a crossover, that means that Jonathan also has a crossover there. Our two options at 98 were either a single crossover for Joanna or a double crossover including Janet and Jonathan. My conclusion:

  • Janet has a crossover at 98
  • Jonathan also has a crossover at 98
  • Joanna does not have a crossover at 98

The immediate result is that I can send Joanna’s DNA over to the right side of the page:

joannamap

In the next step, I want to take advantage of the Joanna to Janet FIR and the places where siblings don’t match at all. This is where there is red in the Browser and no blue bar below. In these areas I will use two different colors.

firhir

The Irony of Vickey’s match

Next, I’d like to use Vickey’s match with Joanna and Janet set the crossover at position 98. We will now pick a ‘side’ to the colors. We will say that Vickey is a red match. In the area between 62 and 98 Joanna and Janet are in a Half Identical Region (HIR). That means that they have one grandparent in common our their four. The irony is that we are mapping this Chromosome to find out where Vickey fits in. Yet we are first using Vickey’s match to map the Chromosome.

vickeyonmap

Here I have added in Vickey’s matches with Joanna, Janet and Jonathan. Note that Janet’s match with Vickey starts right near her crossover. Before that, Janet matched another of her four grandparents (shown in yellow). Also Jonathan’s match with Vickey ends right by his crossover where he received his DNA from another grandparent (the same yellow). Now we have Joanna and her two siblings’ Chromosome 13 roughly mapped out. We have relative positions for their four grandparents. Can we now find out which of Joanna’s grandparents the Mystery Vickey is related to?

Finding Which of Joanna’s Grandparents Matches Vickey

In January, 2016, I wrote a blog about Joanna and her Chromosome 15. Here are the results I came up with (after I went back and corrected a mistake I found):

chr15frazermaprev

I show this to indicate the possible grandparents that Vickey could be related to. Chromosome 15 was also a much easier Chromosome to analyze. There were only three crossovers for Joanna and her siblings on Chromosome 15. The 90-97 area was where Joanna matched a Williams relative. From 67-92, Joanna and Janet matched Frazer relatives.

For Chromosome 13, however, the [maternal] Williams relative did not match with Joanna, Janet and Jonathan. So it will not be possible to make determinations on Joanna’s maternal side. There were, however matches on the Frazer side. Betty has not uploaded her results to Gedmatch, but she is on FTDNA which has a browser and gives Chromosome match locations.  Betty is our last chance to at least identify the paternal part of Joanna and her siblings’ Chromosome 13.  Fortunately, Betty matches Joanna twice and Jonathan once:

bettychr13

Now all I have to do is see where Betty’s DNA would fit on our Chromosome 13 Map.

chr13mapbetty

It looks like Betty has shown that Vickey is related somewhere along the line of Frazer – or more specifically Edward Frazer born in 1867. Here are a few notes on what I did:

  • I extended Jonathan’s Seymour DNA to the right as he had no Frazer match there where his two sisters did. They both matched Vickey. Then I added a blue segment above Jonathan’s yellow segment as Jonathan has a HIR with his two sisters at the end of Chromosome 13.
  • Question: Why didn’t I match Betty to the blue maternal side of the Chromosome? There is room for her DNA there also.
  • Answer: Imagine that I moved all the Betty matches up to the blue segments. That would leave a problem for Janet. In that scenario Joanna would have a blue match and Janet would also have to have the same blue match, but Janet didn’t match Betty from 75-96. Janet also did not match Vickey from 63-107. So that alternative scenario does not work out.
  • For more distant relationships, one would not want to make deductions based on lack of matches. However, with siblings there has to be an explanation as to why one sibling would have a match and the other would not based on the visual mapping.

Edward Frazer is wearing a top hat at the bottom right. In our Chromosome 13 Map, his DNA is shown as red and his Seymour wife as yellow.

frazer1867

The fact that Vickey matches on this Frazer line doesn’t mean that Vickey has to have Frazer ancestors. It just means that she and Edward Frazer must have a common ancestor. That common ancestor may be along the Palmer line, for example (Edward Frazer’s mother’s Line).

Betty to the rescue again

Let’s use Betty’s results to fill in the rest of Joanna’s family’s Chromosome 13:

chr13joannafinished

  • Note that Betty matches Joanna from 29-43 and Jonathan from 33-43. That tells me that Jonathan has a paternal crossover at 33. Because Joanna doesn’t have a paternal crossover at 33, that means she has a maternal crossover there. The rest I fill in using the FIR and HIR regions.
  • The smaller segments at the beginning of the Chromosome correspond with all the crossovers at the beginning of the Chromosome. There are 5 crossovers up to position 33. In Chromosome 15 that I mention earlier in the blog, there were 3 crossovers for the whole Chromosome. After position 33 on Chromosome 13, there are fewer, more spaced out crossovers which account for the larger segments of inherited grandparent DNA.

Summary and Conclusions

  • Visual Mapping can be fun and helpful in finding out where mystery matches come from
  • Without the help of Joanna’s 2nd cousin Betty, we would not have a complete map. We would also not be able to know which grandparent Vickey was related to.
  • If Betty’s results were only at AncestryDNA, we would not be able to do this analysis as AncestryDNA does not give detailed information on DNA matches. The fact that she tested at FTDNA helped us come to these conclusions, even though her results were not uploaded to Gedmatch.com
  • Joanna may know of more test results with known relatives that could help fill out the maternal side of Chromosome 13 or we may find out more in the future.