Hartley YDNA and STR Tree: New Results

This Blog follows on my previous Blog on the subject.  In that Blog, I drew a two person 111 STR Hartley Z17911 Tree. Hartleys that are fairly close to me are assumed to be positive for the SNP Z17911 which was my terminal SNP.

When I look at the new Hartley results, I get the following Hartley Z17911 111 STR signature:

A few points from this new signature:

  • Previously, I was not able to have a 111 STR Hartley Mode. Now with three testers, that is possible. I fudged the mode for 576 as there were three different results: 17, 18 and 19.
  • The first Hartley on the list above is what I was calling the Bradford, West Yorkshire Hartley in the previous Blog
  • The second is the new tester with ancestor William Shepherd Hartley from Manchester, England.
  • The third on the list is me.

A New Hartley SNP

Previously, my terminal SNP was Z17911. Now there is a new shared Hartley SNP called A11132. Here is the SNP tree from the R-Z16357 Project web site:

Thanks to testing by another Hartley with Quaker Pennsylvania and NE Lancashire roots, I have moved down the tree past A11138 to A11132. I am guessing that other Hartleys that am related to by STRs will share this SNP. That means that the Hartley STR Mode I mention above, will also likely be the A11132 Mode.

Some Genealogy For the Newly Tested Hartley

This is part of what I was given for the ancestors of the New Hartley:

William was born in about 1851 in England. (1), Lancashire to be exact (2). His parents were Thomas Hartley and Hannah Shepherd (2).
I was able to find William’s Birth:
From there I found the 1851 Census:
This was a big deal as it shows that the father Thomas was born in the little village of Wray, Lancashire in the Northwest of Lancashire. Thomas’ wedding record was helpful in giving a middle name.
Name: Thomas Townson Hartley
Gender: Male
Marriage Date: 27 Mar 1826
Marriage Place: Manchester, Lancashire, England
Spouse: Hannah Shepherd
FHL Film Number: 1545585
Reference ID: pg152 ln456
From there I searched using the Lancashire Online Parish Search:
Baptism: 26 Aug 1804 St Margaret, Hornby, Lancashire, England
Thos. Townson Heartley – Son of Christopr. Smith Heartley & Mary
Born: 11 Aug
Abode: Wray
Occupation: Hatter
Register: Baptisms 1790 – 1805, Page 47, Entry 5
Source: LDS Film 1526204
Further searching lead to another Christopher Hartley ancestor:
Baptism: 3 Jul 1774 St Wilfrid, Melling, Lancashire, England
Christopher Smith Hartley – Son of Christopher Hartley & Alice
Abode: Wray
Performed at: Hornby Chapel
Register: Baptisms 1752 – 1781, Page 49, Entry 5
Source: LDS Film 1849660
Here is Wray and Hornby in NW Lancashire:

Here is where the Smith name comes in:

Marriage: 16 Dec 1752 St Wilfrid, Melling in Lonsdale, Lancashire, England
Christopher Hartley – Wray in this Parish
Ann Smith – Hornby in this Parish
Notes: X [in left margin]
Register: Marriages 1752 – 1754, Page 1, Entry 6
Source: LDS Film 1849660

Actually, the Bishop’s Transcripts show that Ann may have been Alice:

This is where my easy searching stopped. I did get further than I did on my own Hartley line. We now have a Christopher Hartley for our new YDNA tester probably born around 1725 who lived in Wray, Lancashire in 1752

The reason I go through all the genealogy is that it is interesting to match up the historic Hartley homelands with the DNA. Here is a map with our three testers:

To the upper left of the map shows a circle around Hornby for our new tester. My ancestors were just south of Colne and the other 111 Hartley STR tester had ancestors in Thornton, near Bradford. The distance between Thornton and Wray is probably no more than 35 miles as the crow flies.

Back To the DNA

With my new Hartley 111 STR Signature, I get this tree:

  • Again, it seems obvious to split the two groups by the 455 STR. 455 mutates 0.16 times every one thousand generations. I don’t know about you, but to me that seems like a pretty rare thing. My thinking it that this just happened once.
  • The next three slowest STRs are 540, 1B07 and 445. I had all those mutations, so that puts me by myself. Those three STRs are in the 111 panel, so I won’t be able to check those against other Hartleys until more Z17911 Hartleys test to 111 markers.
  • This groups Thornton and Wray together even though they are further away from each other geographically.
  • How could this tree be dated? If we take the Hartley Mode date to be the beginning of surnames, this could be around 1300 or 1400. A wild guess would be the that the Wray/Thornton ancestor could be about 100 years after that.

A New 67 STR Z179111 Hartley Tree

I say Z17911 Hartley Tree, because there are other Hartleys in other SNP groups that would not be closely enough related to be in a STR tree. First, we need a new 67 STR signature. This signature should be more accurate than the STR signature up to 67 STRs that was done for the 111 STR Tree. This is because there are more Hartleys that have tested 67 STRs.

  • I kept the Hartley mode for 455 as 11 even though it is technically 12. This is because at the low mutation rate, I didn’t think that it could have mutated up and down again in the time frame we are looking at. If I am interpreting the mutation rate correctly, there would be a 16% chance of this STR mutating in about 3,000 years.
  • In the previous analysis, I was the furthest away from the Hartley 111 STR mode. Here, I am the closest. This is because a lot of my differences were in the 111 STR Panel.
  • My inclination is still to separate the two groups of Hartleys by the slow moving 455 STR.

Here is the new 67 STR Hartley Tree:

  • What I was calling the Lancashire and West Yorkshire Hartleys, I’m now calling the Hartley 1 Line and the Hartley 2 Line.
  • I had already grouped Bradford, West Yorkshire and Hartley #3 by 449 and 576. Now I’m grouping our new tester with the West Yorkshire, William based on 389b and CDYb.
  • The Wray, Lancs Hartley and the W Yorks Hartley would be quite a ways apart from each other geographically. Yet they seem to be related by YDNA. Perhaps the Wray, Lancs Hartleys had their roots in West Yorkshire.
  • Joel and Quaker Hartley are the two that have taken the big Y tests. They are both also identified by the A11132 SNP.

Summary and Conclusions

  • Hartley YDNA has been in its infancy but is starting to grow. This is thanks to those Hartleys that have had Big Y tests and STR tests.
  • It would be interesting to see if all the Hartleys in this study have the Z11132 SNP. It is possible that this could be the Hartley SNP. However, this is based on only two Hartleys testing positive for it so far.
  • The 455 STR marker seems to be important in splitting the two Hartley branches. It will be interesting to see if that marker also corresponds to a specific SNP.

 

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